Bibliographies

We invite visiting authors and scholars to submit a "Bibliography," with or without annotation, of books in some way related to their own book or work. Check each post for details on related events!

April 8th, 2021


In celebration of Earth Week, the Seminary Co-op Bookstores are pleased to present a series of reading lists addressing environmental issues and the challenges of sustainability. These lists are organized as part of UChicago ECo, a platform aimed at fostering connection among and support for the University of Chicago’s Environmental Community. You can find the full schedule of Earth Week events organized by UChicago ECo here...

Posted in: Bibliographies
April 8th, 2021

 

In celebration of Earth Week, the Seminary Co-op Bookstores are pleased to present a series of reading lists addressing environmental issues and the challenges of sustainability. These lists are organized as part of UChicago ECo, a platform aimed at fostering connection among and support for the University of Chicago’s Environmental Community. You can find the full schedule of Earth Week events organized by UChicago ECo here, and learn how our shared community is thinking rigorously about environmental impact and ways to leverage data, practices, policies and creativity to help combat climate change. 

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Posted in: Bibliographies
April 8th, 2021

On April 12, join the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge for the first Cultures and Knowledge Workshop of the Spring Term. Professor Sarah Jessica Johnson will be discussing "Uncertainty is the Story: Cecilia’s Pregnancy in a Colonial Prison." This presentation explores how, in 1784, Cecilia Conway—a maroon woman arrested in New Orleans—asserted that she was pregnant and thereby leveraged the power of her reproductive labor. Cecilia was imprisoned at the height of a Spanish campaign against communities of cimarrones living outside New Orleans, and the prison at that time was crowded with maroons. The conversations between Cecilia and the prison's authorities that this work unearths constitute an original archive of Cecilia's assertions while accounting for their heavily-mediated and...

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March 4th, 2021

On March 8, the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge will present the fourth in their Cultures and Knowledge Workshop series for the Winter Term. This workshop, titled "Democracy at Stake: Middle Class Ambivalance in Manila," will be presented by Professor Marco Garrido.

REGISTER HERE

The Filipino middle class was the leading group behind democratization in Manila at the end of the 20th century, helping bring about the ouster of dictator Ferdinand Marcos in 1986. In 2016, however, the upper and middle class largely voted for Rodrigo Duterte, the country’s most anti-democratic president since Marcos, and continued to support him even after his autocratic tendencies became apparent...

Posted in: Bibliographies
February 25th, 2021

On March 1, the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge will present the third in their Cultures and Knowledge Workshop series for the Winter Term. This workshop, titled "Working on a Deadline: Climate Emergency," will be presented by Prof. Jo Guldi.

REGISTER HERE

Scientists and UN advisory bodies have identified our lives as a historical moment of crisis, writ in terms of a limited opportunity for the planet’s inhabitants to decide to keep carbon in the ground. In the university, scholars have proposed a variety of indirect supports to the problem of adjustment, but little environmental scholarship from the humanities and social sciences embodies a truly pragmatic response....

Posted in: Bibliographies
February 15th, 2021

On February 22, the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge will present the second in their Cultures and Knowledge Workshop series for the Winter Term. This workshop, titled "Quantifying Race: How Numbers Divide Us," will be presented by Dr. Iris Clever.

REGISTER HERE

Many of us have interacted with biometric technologies through facial scanners and fingerprints, either on our phone or at the airport. This talk will discuss how these technologies build on older racial research practices. Around 1900, anthropologists and biometricians introduced measurements and statistical methods in racial research to infuse it with precision. With skull-measuring instruments and...

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February 5th, 2021

On February 8, the Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge will present the first in their Cultures and Knowledge Workshop series of webinars. This Monday's workshop, titled "Scenario and Security in Climate Change Documentary," will be presented by Dr. Thomas Pringle, a media theorist drawing on documentary studies, environmental sociology, and environmental and computer history.

Register here for the workshop on February 8.

Below is a list of further reading on the topic of the workshop, compiled by Dr. Pringle:

A Vast Machine: Computer Models, Climate Data, and the...

Posted in: Bibliographies
May 4th, 2020


"In recent weeks, science fiction has been called upon with ...

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February 20th, 2020

As the novel developed into a mature genre, it had to distinguish itself from these similar-looking books and become what we now call "literature." Literary scholars have explained the rise of the Anglophone novel using a range of tools, from Ian Watt’s theories to James Watt’s inventions. Contrary to established narratives, When Novels Were Books reveals that the genre beloved of so many readers today was not born secular, national, middle-class, or female. For the first three centuries of their history, novels came into readers’ hands primarily as printed sheets ordered into a codex bound along one edge between boards or paper wrappers....

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December 18th, 2019

How things are divided up or pieced together matters. Half a bridge is of no use at all. Conversely, many things would do more good if they could be divided up differently: Perhaps you would prefer a job that involves a third less work and a third less pay or a car that materializes only when needed and is priced accordingly? Difficulties in "slicing" and "lumping" shape nearly every facet of how we live and work--and a great deal of law and policy as well.

In Slices and Lumps, Lee Anne Fennell explores how both types of challenges--carving out useful slices and assembling useful lumps--surface in myriad contexts, from hot button issues like conservation and eminent domain to developments in the sharing economy to personal struggles over work,...

Posted in: Bibliographies